Cover Crop, Cool Season Soil Building Mix

L.A.Hearne

$ 19.00

Size

Certified Organic Cover Crop Seed

Cool Season Soil Building Mix

Growing a cover crop (aka Green Manure) is a wonderful way to build soil organic matter, protect the soil against erosion, fix nitrogen, provide habitat for beneficial insects & pollinators and so much more! We typically plant cool season cover crops after harvesting the last of the summer garden which is typically in October here in Oregon.  Alternately, they can be planted as early in late winter or early spring as possible.  

This mixture of cool season varieties is a proven mix that we use here on our farm and in gardens. The cereal grain Oats sprout quickly and provide a vertical scaffold for the peas and vetch to climb. The Bell Beans are a small seeded Fava that sprouts quickly and provides fast growth and coverage and abundant nitrogen fixation.  A cereal grain and legume mix can grow from 2 to 5 tons (!!!) of biomass per acre, that's 40-100 pounds for a 100 square foot area.

* We regret that we are unable to ship this product internationally in amounts larger than 1 pound *

Seeding rates:   75-150 pounds per acre 

1/4-1/2 pound per 100 sq.ft.,

5-6# for 1000 sq.ft.  A cereal grain and legume mix can grow from 2 to 5 tons (!!!) of biomass per acre, that's 40-100 pounds for a 100 square foot area.

* Cool Season Soil Building Mix contains: (15% Cayuse Oats, 30% Bell Beans (favas), 29% Purple Hairy Vetch, 10% Magnus Peas, 14% Dundale Peas)

CSCCS1: 1 Pound: $7

CSCCS2: 3 pounds: $19

CSCCS3: 5 pounds: $30

At present we Also have the following seeds and hope to be adding more soon. Click the Variety to go to it's page and read more, or to buy some.

* Lana Vetch

* Magnus Peas - Also works for growing delicious Pea shoots as microgreens

* Dunedale Peas - Also works for growing delicious Pea shoots as microgreens

* Bunker Triticale (a fast growing hybrid of wheat and Rye - can be used for growing wheat grass too)

* Barley, UC 937 - provides quick growth in fall and winter and supports other climbing legumes like peas and vetch.

If you are interested in technical data, then here is a great research report done in Western Oregon by the USDA-NRCS: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_PLANTMATERIALS/publications/orpmcsr13282.pdf

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